Ambiguity hides in simplicity.

Imagine that on your first day working at a record store, your manager says, "Our records are organized alphabetically." Under this direction, you file your first batch of vinyl with ease.

Later, you overhear a coworker saying, "Sorry, it looks like we're sold out of Michael Jackson right now."

Your manager looks under "J" and checks the inventory, which says the store should have a single copy of Thriller.

You remember that it was part of the shipment of records you just filed. Where else could you have put that record, if not under "J"? Maybe under "M"?

The ambiguity that's wrapped up in something as simple as "alphabetize these" is truly amazing.

We give and receive instructions all day long. Ambiguous instructions can weaken our structures and their trustworthiness. It's only so long after that first album is misfiled that chaos ensues.



< Previous PageNext Page >