Fuzzy (adjective.)

Definition: Difficult to perceive clearly or understand and explain precisely.

Also referenced as: Fuzziness (noun)

Related to: Assumption, Data, Linguistic Insecurity, Meaning, Misunderstandings



The word fuzzy was used 3 times across 3 pages


Chapter 5: Measure the Distance | Page 96

What is good for one person can be profoundly bad for another, even if their goal is roughly the same. We each live within a unique set of contradictions and experiences that shape how we see the world.

Remember that there's no right or wrong way to do something. Words like right and wrong are subjective.

The important part is being honest about what you intend to accomplish within the complicated reality of your life. Your intent may differ from other people; you may perceive things differently.

You may be dealing with an indicator that's surprisingly difficult to measure, a data source that's grossly unreliable, or a perceptual baseline that's impossible to back up with data.

But as fuzzy as your lens can seem, setting goals with incomplete data is still a good way to determine if you're moving in the right direction.

Uncertainty comes up in almost every project. But you can only learn from those moments if you don't give up. Stick with the tasks that help you clarify and measure the distance ahead.



Chapter 5: Measure the Distance | Page 98

Think about what you're trying to accomplish.

  1. Revisit what you intend to do and why. Now break it down into specific goals.
  2. Make a dream list of what would be measureable in an ideal world. Even if the measurement is fuzzy or hard to find, it's useful to think about the best-case scenario.
  3. Remember to mine data from people.
  4. Measure the baseline of what you can. Once you have your dream list, narrow it down to an achievable set of measurements to gather a baseline reading of.
  5. Make a list of indicators to potentially measure.
  6. List some situations where you'd want to be notified if things change. Then, figure out how to make those flags for yourself.


Chapter 7: Prepare to Adjust | Page 127

It's hard to decide to tear down a wall, take off the roof, or rip up the floorboards. It's hard to admit when something architectural isn't serving you.

It's hard to find the words for what's wrong.

It's hard to deal with the time between understanding something is wrong and fixing it.

It's hard to get there.

It's hard to be honest about what went right and what went poorly in the past.

It's hard to argue with people you work with about fuzzy things like meaning and truth.

It's hard to ask questions.

It's hard to hear criticism.

It's hard to start over.

It's hard to get to good.